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LEVEL OF DESCRIPTION: Sous-fonds
No.: GR0005.007SF
TITLE: Alberta Dairy Control Board sous-fonds
CREATOR: Alberta Dairy Control Board
DATE RANGE: 1969-2002
EXTENT: 0.00 m of textual records
ADMINISTRATIVE
HISTORY/BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH: Dates of Founding and/or Dissolution:
The Alberta Dairy Control Board was established on November 1, 1969 as the Alberta Milk Control Board under An Act to Amend the Milk Control Act (S.A. 1969, c. 70). Its name was changed to the Alberta Dairy Control Board in 1972. The board was wound up on August 1, 2002, and its responsibilities were transferred to Alberta Milk, an industry-managed organization.

Functional Responsibility:
The original function of the Alberta Dairy Control Board was to control and regulate the sale of milk, as decreed in the Milk Control Act (R.S.A. 1970, c. 234) and Dairy Board Act (R.S.A. 1980, c. D-1). This was revised in 1999 when the Alberta Dairy Control Board was charged with carrying out any power or duty conferred or imposed on it by the Dairy Industry Act (S.A. 1999, c. D-1.2). This legislation also empowered the Alberta Dairy Control Board to accept and act on recommendations of the director and on the determinations referred to in section 12(1) of the Dairy Industry Act.

The Dairy Control Board administered two distinct sections. A fluid-milk quota was created to ensure an adequate and regularly available supply of fresh milk for consumers. The market share quota was the national quota created by the Canadian Dairy Commission to ensure an adequate supply of milk to meet Canada domestic requirements for the production of ice-cream, cheese, and butter.

Predecessor and Successor Bodies:
The function of controlling and regulating the sale of milk dates back to 1933. The Great Depression affected the prices and markets of all agricultural products. Farmers seeking relief from low grain and livestock returns turned to the production and distribution of milk as a partial solution to their financial problems. This increased production created an oversupply of milk on the market. Established dairy farmers applied to the provincial government to create legislation to regulate the milk industry. The result was an amendment to the Public Utilities Act (S.A. 1933, c. 18). This amendment placed the control of the production and distribution of milk under the jurisdiction of the Board of Public Utility Commissioners.

The Board of Public Utility Commissioners' jurisdiction over milk was limited by federal legislation affecting the control of milk. Before the spring of 1943, the Wartime Price and Trade Board had exclusive jurisdiction over milk prices and milk supply. The federal government then appointed a federal food board to have jurisdiction over milk supply, leaving jurisdiction over prices with the Wartime Prices and Trade Board. The Board of Public Utility Commissioners would meet with the Food Board, Wartime Prices and Trade Board, and all other milk boards in the Dominion to review and make decisions regarding the supply and price of milk. The Board of Public Utility Commissioners and other milk boards could make recommendations but the final approval was with the Food Board and Wartime Price and Trade Board. During this time, the work of the Board of Public Utility Commissioners was primarily administrative in nature.

The Milk Control Act (S.A. 1966, c. 55) received Royal assent on April 7, 1966. Under this legislation, the Board of Public Utility Commissioners continued to control and regulate the milk industry. In 1969, An Act to Amend the Milk Control Act struck out the Board of Public Utility Commissioners and created the Alberta Milk Control Board.

In 2000, planning began for the privatization of the Alberta Dairy Control Board. The Alberta Dairy Control Board Act was repealed during the 2002 spring sitting of the Legislature. At the end of the milk year, July 31, 2002, the function and activities of the Alberta Dairy Control Board were merged with those of the Alberta Milk (Society) to form a new corporation, also called Alberta Milk. This new entity reports to the Alberta Agricultural Products Marketing Council.

Administrative Relationships:
The first annual report published by the Alberta Dairy Control Board was for the 1986-1987 reporting period. In previous years, the board's report had been combined with that of the Dairy Division of Alberta Agriculture, which presented an annual report to the Minister of Agriculture. In 1987, the Alberta Diary Control Board began to report to the Minister of Agriculture. The minister then transmitted the reports to the Legislative Assembly.

The Alberta Diary Control Board was a member and one of the signatories of the comprehensive, nationally binding, Milk Marketing Plan, which governs the production of industrial milk in Canada. In 1995, the Alberta Dairy Control Board arranged with the signatories of the National Milk Marketing Plan to provide for the pooling of revenues from sales of milk components in special classes of milk sold in both domestic and external markets.

Administrative Structure:
In the enabling legislation, the Lieutenant Governor in Council appointed not more than three members to the board, and designated a chair. In the revised version of the Dairy Board Act, the number of members on the board increased to five. The Lieutenant Governor designated the chair of the Dairy Control Board and set the remuneration to be paid to the members.

Names of the Corporate bodies:
The Alberta Dairy Control Board was incorporated under the name of Alberta Milk Control Board. A year later, the name of the corporation was changed to the Alberta Dairy Control Board in The Milk Control Amendment Act, (S. A. Chapter 66, 1972).

Names of Chief Officers:
Chair of the Alberta Milk Control Board
Stewart H. Thomas (1968-1972)

Chairs of the Alberta Dairy Control Board
Stewart H. Thomas (1972-1977)
James R. Gylander (1977-1983)
Michael Dordevic (1984-1989)
James P. Heron (1990-2000)
Brian Rhiness (2001-2002)

SCOPE AND CONTENT: There are no records in custody of the Provincial Archives at this time.
RELATED FONDS: GR0005 (Agriculture, Food and Rural Development fonds)
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