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IVERSON FARMSTEAD

New Norway, Near

Other Names:
Iverson Homestead

Statement of Significance

Description of Historic Place


Heritage Value


Character-Defining Elements


Location



Street Address:
Community: New Norway, Near
Boundaries: Southeast quarter of Section 22, Township 45, Range 21, West of the Fourth Meridian
Contributing Resources:

ATS Legal Description:
Mer Rge Twp Sec LSD
4
4
4
4
21
21
21
21
45
45
45
45
22
22
22
22
01
02
07
08

PBL Legal Description (Cadastral Reference):
Plan Block Lot Parcel

Latitude/Longitude:
Latitude Longitude CDT Datum Type
52.890561 -112.961572

UTM Reference:
Northing Easting Zone CDT Datum Type

Recognition

Recognition Authority: Province of Alberta
Designation Status: Registered Historic Resource
Date of Designation: 1993/10/04

Historical Information

Built:
Significant Date(s) N/A
Theme(s)
Historic Function(s): Food Supply : Farm or Ranch
Current Function(s):
Architect:
Builder:
Context: HERITAGE SIGNIFICANCE

The dates 1896 to 1914 are considered to be those of the major settlement period in Alberta's history. The 1880s and early 1890s, though, witnessed a trickle of immigrants moving into Alberta. Utah Mormons selected the drylands of southern Alberta, Icelanders from Dakota Territory sought land in west central Alberta in the late 1880s, significant numbers of other Scandinavians - Norwegians and Swedes - emigrated from the land of their first choice, the United States, to Canada and Alberta.

Amongst the first wave of Norwegians to move from the U.S. was the Gullick Iverson family. Members of a Norwegian settlement at Cross Lake, Minnesota, the Iversons, like most of their countrymen, followed the advice of their scouts and pulled up stakes in June 1893 to relocate in central Alberta, north of the Red Deer River. They were among the first wave of Scandinavians to settle in what became a large, rambling bloc east of the Calgary-Edmonton rail line of the C.P.R. Ethnically and religiously cohesive, the Scandinavian settlement retained much of its character until World War Two. When branch rail lines were built after 1900, the Iversons found themselves within two miles of the Camrose-Calgary branch line and the Village of New Norway.

The Iversons settled on the southeast quarter of Section 22, Township 45, Range 21, West of the Fourth Meridian that summer. The size and configuration of the first home is unknown, but it was almost assuredly a well-constructed log building with dovetail corner joints, a technique and skill that the Norwegians brought with them to North America. The 1893 home was probably what is now either the living room or kitchen with the rest of the main floor being added within a few years of settlement; it was quite common for early homes either to be replaced or to expand over a period of years according to need and the family's financial state. The second storey would have been an even later addition.

Additional Information

Object Number: 4665-0655
Designation File: Des. 1762
Related Listing(s):
Heritage Survey File: HS 81400
Website Link:
Data Source: Alberta Culture and Community Spirit, Historic Resources Management Branch, Old St. Stephen's College, 8820 - 112 Street, Edmonton, AB T6G 2P8 (File: Des. 1762)
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