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Key Number: HS 19800
Site Name: Annandale Residence
Other Names:
Site Type: 0101 - Residential: Single Dwelling

Location

ATS Legal Description:
Twp Rge Mer
9 21 4


Address: 1280 - 4 Avenue S
Number: 80
Street: 12 S
Avenue: 4 S
Other:
Town: Lethbridge
Near Town:

Media

Type Number Date View
Source

Architectural

Style:
Plan Shape: Square
Storeys: Storeys: 2
Foundation: Basement/Foundation Wall Material: Concrete
Superstructure: Nailed Frame
Superstructure Cover: Wood: Shiplap Wood: Shingle or Shake
Roof Structure: Medium Hip
Roof Cover: Wood
Exterior Codes: Roof Trim - Eaves: Projecting Eaves
Roof Trim - Eaves: Plain Frieze
Roof Trim - Eaves: Brackets
Dormer Type: Hip
Chimney Stack Material: Brick
Window - Trim Outside Structural Opening - Head: Shelf
Window - Trim Outside Structural Opening - Sides: Plain
Window - Sill Type: Moulded Slip Sill
Window - Special Types: Bay, Bow or Oriel
Window - Special Types: Bay or Bow, 2 or More Storeys
Main Entrance - Structural Opening Shape: Semi-Circular
Main Porch - Type: Recess
Main Porch - Type: Open Porch
Main Porch - Special Features: Arcade
Exterior: The Annandale house is a two and one-half storey frame building resting on a concrete and brick foundation. Perhaps its most striking feature is the bell cast hip roof with bell cast hip dormers on the north and east slopes and decorative wood brackets on the underside of the exaggerated eaves. Other interesting features include a porch with semicircular doorways, an east porch with a bell cast roof, bay windows and corbelled chimneys.
South of the house stands a single vehicle frame garage with many repeated, scaled-down decorative elements found on the house. These features include a bell cast hip roof and wood eave brackets as well as horizontal bevel siding.
* * *
Shiplap ground siding, wood shingles upper storey siding, recessed porch with additional open porch, decorative chimney.
Interior: Some interoir features include two main floor fireplaces, period wainscot and woodwork throughout the house and an elaborate staircase east of the main foyer.
Environment: The house is located on a corner lot in the London Road area of Lethbridge southeast to the central business district. The landscaping (a lawn, a series of hedges and some shrubbery) does not appear to date from the early years of the house. The London Road district exhibits houses of a similar vintage and style reflecting its status as one of Lethbridge's wealthier districts. The Hardie residence which has already been designated as a Registered Historic Resource is located in the area. Residential corner of high traffic intersection.
Condition: The house is generally in very good condition with no major defects or water damage evident. Listed below are some minor problems. - only a part of the area below the house has been excavated. The structural integrity of the area under the crawlspace is unknown. The concrete floor in the excavated protion is cracked. - a sagging floor problem on the main floor has been corrected by installing additional jack posts and beams. This might need further professional attention. - asphalt roof shingles require replacing. - brick chimneys need repointing - parging missing on exterior foundation wall in places. Good (2004)
Alterations:

Historical

Construction: Construction Date:
Constructed
1909/01/01
Usage: Usage Date:
Residence
1909/01/01
Owner: Owner Date:
Martin Johnston, K.C.
Bank of Nova Scotia
George G. Ross
George Rice
David Pravan
Garfield O. Bland and Diane R. Bland
1909/01/01
1935/01/01
1937/01/01
1940/01/01
1983/05/01
1984/11/14
Architect: N/A
Builder: N/A
Craftsman: N/A
History: History:
The Annandale residence was given its name by its original owner, Lewis Martin Johnston, K.C., who occupied the house from the date of its construction in 1909 until his departure for Vancouver Island in 1935. It was constructed during a period of economic expansion for Lethbridge that was reflected in the many fine residences of the London Road district, where the prominent citizens included W.D.L.
Hardie, Superintentent of the Galt Coal Mines and Mayor of Lethbridge.
Johnston was a founding partner in the law firm of Hucksalle and Company and was active in the community, serving as Vice-President of the Chinook Club in 1909.
From 1935 to 1937 the house was rented by the Bank of Nova Scotia for use by its local manager. In 1937 it was purchased by George G. Ross who operated a 250,000 acre ranch in the Lethbridge area and was active in many community, provincial, national and international affairs. He was one of the founders of the Community Auction Sales Association; one of oldest members and a past president of the Western Stock Grower's Association; a past chairman and director of the Canadian Council of Beef Producers, both national and western section; and a charter member of the Flying Farmers of Alberta.
In 1940 the Annandale residence was sold to George Rice, another Lawyer. Rice had originally arrived in Lethbridge in 1914, and practised in partnership with G.C. Paterson at the time of the house purchase. After the Rice family sold the house, it was used by different individuals in a series of functions: as a private dwelling, an apartment house, a rooming house and half-way house. The present owners are restoring it to its original use as a single family dwelling.
Architectural Significance:
The Annandale residence represents a variation on the Georgian Revival style of architecture which was popular for residence in Alberta from the 1880s until 1915. Its main source of ideas was the architecture of colonial America although it also drew upon English architecture of the same period. These neo-colonial buildings are strictly regular in plan, with a miniumum of minor projections and have strictly symmetric al facades. Roofs are hipped and their eaves are detailed as classical cornices. Chimneys are placed to contribute to the overall symmetry. Elements in the Annandale Residence which reflect the Georgian Revival influence include its hipped roof, the shed dormers on three sides of the roof and the wide eaves with the large brackets underneath.
It deviates from this style in its lack of symmetry, which is particularly evident in the design of the front entrance-way. The front entrance-way is incorporated into the northeast corner of the building rather than being in the centre of the front facade. The front verandah is small and located to one side of the entrance-way rather than along the full length of the front facade. Nor is the two storey bay window on the north facade centred. These asymmetrical aspects may reflect the influence of the Queen Anne Style that was also popular at the time, and illustrate an eclectic approach to residential design that was an important feature in the Alberta tradition of substantial houses.
* * *
Draft Press Release Edmonton, Alberta
The Honourable Greg Stevens, Minister of Alberta Culture and Multiculturalism, announced today that the Annandale residence in Lethbridge has been designated a Registred Historic Resource.
The Annandale residence was given its name by its original owner, Lewis Martin Johnstone K.C., who occupied the house from the date of its construction in 1909 until his departure for Vancouver Island in 1935. Johnstone was a founding partner in the Lethbridge law firm of Huckvale and Company and was active in the community, serving as Vice-President of the Chinook Club in 1909.
Another notable individual associated with this house was George D.
Ross, who operated a 250,000 acre ranch in the Lethbridge area and was active in many community, provincial, national and international affairs. He was one of the founders of the Community Auction Sales Association; one of the oldest members and a past resident of the Western Stock Growers' Association; a past chairman and director of the Canadian Council of Beef Producers, both national and western section; and a charter member of the Flying Farmers of Alberta.
Reminiscent of Alberta prosperity just before World War I, the Annandale Residence represents a variation on the Georgian Revival style of residential architecture popular in Alberta from the 1880s the First World War. Elements in the Annandale Residence which reflects this style include its hipped roof, the shed dormers on three sides of the roof and the wide eaves with large brackets underneath.

Internal

Status: Status Date:
Active
Active
1983/05/26
2004/02/23
Designation Status: Designation Date:
Registered Historic Resource
1988/03/30
Register:
Record Information: Record Information Date:
K. Williams 1989/08/30

Links

Internet:
Alberta Register of Historic Places: 4665-0593
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