Logged in as user  [Login]  |
ARHP
Return to Search Results Printable Version
 





Key Number: HS 46804
Site Name: Peace River N.A.R. Station
Other Names:
Site Type: 0803 - Transportation - Rail Facility: Station

Location

ATS Legal Description:
Twp Rge Mer
84 21 5


Address: 9409 - 100 Street
Number: 9
Street: 100
Avenue: 94
Other:
Town: Peace River
Near Town:

Media

Type Number Date View
Source

Architectural

Style:
Plan Shape: Rectangular
Storeys: Storeys: 1
Foundation:
Superstructure: Nailed Frame
Superstructure Cover:
Roof Structure: Medium Gable
Roof Cover:
Exterior Codes:
Exterior: Centre gable dormers on two faces of upper roof, the bay extension trackside continues through the second floor, extended eaves, trackside with brackets under both major awning and secondary eaves.
Brackets under north eaves and under all eaves on the main part, the wood platform is about 190 x 10 feet the station is painted green.
Interior: N/A
Environment:
Condition:
Alterations: Freight shed added.

Historical

Construction: Construction Date:
Constructed
1916/01/01
Usage: Usage Date:
Railway Station
1916/01/01
Owner: Owner Date:
Railink Canada Ltd.
The Town of Peace Rever (Lessee)


Architect: N/A
Builder: Harry Weaver
Craftsman: N/A
History: 1916 - station construction.
1942 - alterations amounting to $704.43.
1943 - alterations amounting to $733.75.
Part of the Canadian Central Railway line to Dunvegan (originally).
Station is still used for freight traffic.
* * *
1916 or 1917 station constructed.
1920s - freight shed addition built, there originally was a smaller shed.
Passenger service continued until the 1960s.
Mr. Pitts manager of N.A.R. has said that Sir Alexander Mackenzie historical Society may buy the station for one dollar when the time comes, providing they move it.
* * *
The Peace River N.A.R. Station is a one a half storey frame railway station constructed in 1916. It features an extended bellcast roof and bay office windows. The building sustained minor renovations in 1942 and 1943. The station is still open, but carries freight traffic only.

Historical Significance:
The Peace River Railway station was one of many built during the period of railway development in Northern Alberta between 1912 and 1916. It was built by the Central Canada Railway Company which was one of three railway incorporated at the initiative of the Provincial Government in order to develop Northern Alberta. These three railways prior to 1920 were under the control of J.D. McArthur a Winnipeg based railway contractor and entrepreneur. In 1916 J.D. McArthur's Central Canada Railway Company completed a line to Peace River Crossing, from its connection with his Edmonton, Dunvegan and B.C. Railway at McLennan. This completed the linking by rail of all three major points in the Peace River Country - Spirit River. Grande Prairie, and Peace River - with the City of Edmonton, and laid the basis for a period of rapid growth in agricultural settlement and economic development that was to follow in the 1920's.
Peace River was originally established as a fur trade post by the Hudson's Bay Company in 1877. It did not begin to emerge, however, as the dominant urban centre in the region until 1910. By 1915 on the eve of the arrival of the railway, it had a population of 700 along with various commercial establishments, branches of the Bank of Commerce and the Royal Bank and detachment of the Royal North West Mounted Police. It was also the base of operations for a number of riverboats which operated as far south as beaver landing on the Smoky River and as far north as the Mackenzie. The arrival of the railway further added to Peace River's importance role in northern transportation.

Architectural Significance:
The railway companies building in Western Canada each developed a number of standard station plans, ranging from the spartan freight shed / passenger shelter built at isolated sidings, to the opulent stations found at the major population centres. The type of structure built was a function of the level of business projected for an area at which a siding was located; the higher the level of service required, the greater the space of facilities that would be provided for ticket sales, operations control, freight and baggage handling, and passenger accommodation.
The Peace River station is described by Les Kozma as being an example of Plan Dr-H-109. It is similar to the other stations constructed by J.D. McArthur at Smith and Lac La Biche.
* * *
Draft Press Release Edmonton, Alberta
The Honorable Greg Stevens, Minister of Alberta Culture and Multiculturalism, announced today that the railway station in Peace River has been designated a Provincial Historic Resource.
The Peace River Railway station is one of the few remaining from the era of railway building in the Peace River Country between 1912 and 1916. It was constructed by the Central Canadian Railway Company which was one of three railways incorporated at the initiative of the Provincial Government in order to develop Northern Alberta. Prior to 1920, these three railways were under the control of J.D. McArthur's Central Canada Railway Company completed a line to Peace River Crossing from its connection with his Edmonton, Dunvegan and B.C. Railway at McLennan. This completed the rail link of all three major points in the Peace River Country - Spirit River, Grande Prairie, and Peace River - with the City of Edmonton, and laid the basis for a period of rapid growth in agricultural settlement and economic development in the 1920s.
One the eve of the railway's arrival in 1915, Peace River had a population of 700 along with various commercial establishments, branches of the Bank of Commerce and the Royal Bank and a detachment of the Royal North West Mounted Police. It was also the base of operations for a number of riverboats which operated as far south as Beaver Landing on the Smoky River and as far north as the Mackenzie.
The arrival of the railway added to Peace River's important role in northern transportation.
The Peace River station is a two-storey wood frame structure which provided a warehouse for the handling of freight, a waiting room for passengers, office space, and living quarters for the station agent.
Following the Canadian railway tradition of repeating standard plans, this design was the same as that used at Smith and Lac La Biche.

Internal

Status: Status Date:
Active
1979/09/03
Designation Status: Designation Date:
Provincial Historic Resource
1988/04/29
Register:
Record Information: Record Information Date:
K. Williams 1991/05/13

Links

Internet:
Alberta Register of Historic Places: 4665-0575
Return to Search Results Printable Version



Freedom to Create. Spirit to Achieve.


Home    Contact Us    Login   Library Search

© 1995 - 2020 Government of Alberta    Copyright and Disclaimer    Privacy    Accessibility